• Sanjukta Moorthy

Data Equity Resources

A selection of papers and books where you can learn more about data equity, indigenous research, the importance of reshaping the way we organise and conduct data analysis, and other methodologies.


Indicators Relevant for Indigenous Peoples: A Resource Book was created through a series of on the ground workshops to develop data indicators and definitions that are meaningful and useful to Indigenous communities.







Elements of Indigenous Style: A Guide for Writing by and about Indigenous Peoples by Gregory Younging

This book offers Indigenous writers and editors-and everyone creating works about Indigenous Peoples-the first published guide to common questions and issues of style and process. Everyone working in words or other media needs to read this important new reference, and to keep it nearby while they're working.


This guide features:

  • Twenty-two succinct style principles.

  • Advice on culturally appropriate publishing practices, including how to collaborate with - Indigenous Peoples, when and how to seek the advice of Elders, and how to respect Indigenous Oral Traditions and Traditional Knowledge.

  • Terminology to use and to avoid.

  • Advice on specific editing issues, such as biased language, capitalization, and quoting from historical sources and archives.

  • Case studies of projects that illustrate best practices.

Indigenous Statistics: A Quantitative Research Methodology, by Maggie Walter and Chris Anderson

In the first book ever published on Indigenous quantitative methodologies, Maggie Walter and Chris Andersen open up a major new approach to research across the disciplines and applied fields.


While qualitative methods have been rigorously critiqued and reformulated, the population statistics relied on by virtually all research on Indigenous peoples continue to be taken for granted as straightforward, transparent numbers. This book dismantles that persistent positivism with a forceful critique, then fills the void with a new paradigm for Indigenous quantitative methods, using concrete examples of research projects from First World Indigenous peoples in the United States, Australia, and Canada. Concise and accessible, it is an ideal supplementary text as well as a core component of the methodological toolkit for anyone conducting Indigenous research or using Indigenous population statistics.


Feminism Counts: Quantitative Methods and Researching Gender by Christina Hughes

This is an important and timely text that provides a unique overview of contemporary quantitative approaches to gender research. The contributors are internationally recognised researchers from the UK, USA and Sweden who occupy a range of disciplinary locations, including historical demography, sociology and policy studies. Their research includes explorations of heterosexual and same-sex violence, media responses to feminist research, data sources for the study of equalities, approaches for analysing global and local demographic change and intersectional concerns in respect of work and employment.


Just Research in Contentious Times by Michelle Fine

In this intensely powerful and personal new text, Michelle Fine widens the methodological imagination for students, educators, scholars, and researchers interested in crafting research with communities. Fine shares her struggles over the course of 30 years to translate research into policy and practice that can enhance the human condition and create a more just world. In lively conversations with W.E.B. DuBois, Gloria Anzaldua, Maxine Greene, and Audre Lorde, the book examines a wide array of critical participatory action research (PAR) projects involving school push-outs, Muslim American youth, queer youth of color, women in prison, and children navigating under-resourced schools. Throughout, Fine assists readers as they consider sensitive decisions about epistemology, ethics, politics, and methods; critical approaches to analysis and interpretation; and participatory strategies for policy development and organizing. Just Research is an invaluable guide for creating successful participatory action research projects in times of inequity and uncertainty.

Indigenous Research Methodologies by Bagele Chilisa

This second edition situates research in a larger, historical, cultural and global context, addressing the increasing emphasis in the classroom and in the field on sensitizing researchers and students to diverse perspectives--especially those of women, minority groups, former colonized societies, indigenous people, historically oppressed communities, and people with disabilities.


Chapters cover the history of research methods, ethical conduct, colonial and postcolonial epistemologies, relational epistemologies, emergent and indigenous methodologies, Afrocentric research, feminist research, narrative frameworks, interviewing, and participatory methods.


Additional information on indigenous quantitative research reflects new developments in the field. New activities and web resources offer more depth and new ways for students to extend their knowledge. This textbook includes features such as key points, learning objectives, student exercises, chapter summaries, and suggested readings, making it an ideal textbook for graduate-level courses.


Applying Indigenous Research Methods by Sweeney Windchief

Applying Indigenous Research Methods focuses on the question of "How" Indigenous Research Methodologies (IRMs) can be used and taught across Indigenous studies and education.


In this collection, Indigenous scholars address the importance of IRMs in their own scholarship, while focusing conversations on the application with others. Each chapter is co-authored to model methods rooted in the sharing of stories to strengthen relationships, such as yarning, storywork, and others. The chapters offer a wealth of specific examples, as told by researchers about their research methods in conversation with other scholars, teachers, and community members.


Applying Indigenous Research Methods is an interdisciplinary showcase of the ways IRMs can enhance scholarship in fields including education, Indigenous studies, settler colonial studies, social work, qualitative methodologies, and beyond.